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MPH-GH

Subjects

 

  • GH600: Social Determinants of Health

    3 credits | required | trimester-1

    Health and wellbeing is influenced by the conditions in which people are born, grow up, live, and work. The social determinants are a major contributor to the inequitable outcomes seen within and between countries. Social structures create the context for individual and group behaviour and are intended to provide the resources people need to survive. How people act and live is shaped in large part by the social structures in which they find themselves. Too often however, society's social systems are characterized by exploitation, political exclusion, discrimination, and unequal access to resources. This course introduces students to the importance of societal systems to health and in particular to global health. Basic concepts in social sciences are introduced before focusing on the changing nature of societies and the way societal dynamics intersect with global health. Particular attention will be given to the discussion on "social determinants of health" and health inequities.

  • GH601: Physical Environments and Health

    3 credits | required | trimester-1

    Conditions related to accelerated changes in natural and built environments have unprecedented implications for human health and well-being on a global scale. Sustainable human security requires that gains in wellbeing be accompanied by corresponding gains in sustainability of ecosystems and built environments. This course addresses the intersection of political, economic and social factors that compound the effects of environmental degradation, urbanization, and xenobiotic exposures. Concepts of contamination and deficiencies of air, water, food, soil, and other potential sources of xenobiotic will be reviewed, as will public health successes and failures. Students will learn about the local and global effects of policy on the environment and how these ultimately affect human health and wellbeing. Through integration with case studies students are encouraged to engage in more in-depth study of changes in physical and built environments, their effects on eco-systems, human security and health and wellbeing.

  • GH602: Applied Epidemiology

    3 credits | required | trimester-1

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health in populations and the application of this study to improve health outcomes. It is the basic science of public health. This course introduces students to the field of public health epidemiology from a global perspective, emphasizing methods for assessing factors associated with the distribution and aetiology of health and disease. Skills include methods for identifying and evaluating sources of health information, calculation of key epidemiologic measures, epidemiological investigation techniques, and evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different study designs.

  • GH603: Applied Biostatistics

    3 credits | required | trimester-1

    The course provides applications of inferential statistics to global public health problems. Major topics include basic probability, random variables and their probability distributions, parameter estimation, test of hypotheses, chi-square procedures, correlation, regression, and some nonparametric methods. In addition to class lectures, students will have laboratory sessions to practice skills at data analysis and interpretation using a statistical software package.

  • GH604: Policy Development and Analysis

    This course introduces students to the process of policy-making. It integrates power and process into the study of the relation between public policy and health. It views these two themes as integral to understanding policy. Who makes and implements policy decisions and how decisions are made largely determine the content of public policy. Much of what is currently available deals with the content of public policy or what policy is; surprisingly little guidance is available to public health professionals who want to understand how issues make their way onto policy agendas while other initiatives languish.

  • GH605: Foundations in Global Health-1

    3 credits | exchange | trimester-1

    This course is an exchange course conducted at Maastricht University. Students are provided with essential tools for critically assessing problems in global policy from an international; national; and local perspective. Conventional approaches of policy analysis often focus on effectiveness of policy solutions. The critical approach used in the course focuses on the initial phase in the policy cycle: defining the problem. Policy addresses problems, but problems are never given neither can they be neutrally defined. They are always defined or framed in the policy itself, from a certain perspective. The central question is not: What does the policy say? And how can we improve it? But rather, what does not the policy say? And how might it be different if those whose voices are excluded were included?

  • GH610: Human Security: A Global Perspective

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    This inter-disciplinary course will introduce students to the concept of human security. Human security refers to the security of individuals and communities as opposed to the security of the state. It combines the various components of human security; freedom from fear and freedom from want. The course will introduce students to the debates about the concept and its relevance in the contemporary era. It will combine political, military, legal and economic approaches to human security implementation. The course will cover: intellectual foundations and debates over the concept of human security; and contemporary cases of conflict; urbanization; disease; climate change; depletion of natural resources; food and public nutrition applied to human security; international humanitarian law and human rights law; humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect; and international capabilities for human security. Case studies make use of ethnographies, epidemiologic studies, program reports, and policy papers.

  • GH611: Human Rights and Global Health

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    This course reflects on the evolution and instruments of human rights, visiting the state of the debate on human rights with a focus on health as a human right. Special attention is given to women's rights as a human right, the effects of globalization on rights and social exclusion, the role of non-state actors in monitoring policy making and practices affecting human rights, and discusses living human rights in the 21st century. The course makes use of relevant case studies, team work, and interactive approaches to foster an ongoing dialogue on human rights concepts, principles, and varying perspectives.

  • GH612: Mobility and Global Health

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    This course applies a critical appraisal; with a focus on interrelationships of economic conditions, partnerships, funding and the politics; of issues such as: migration (domestic & international), refugees, trafficking, international human rights and global health, international perspectives on equity, health & foreign policy, global health: a local issue, gender-globalization and health (mental health, violence, occupational health & safety, infectious diseases, addictions), urbanization and health. Case studies make use of ethnographies, epidemiologic studies, program reports, and policy papers.

  • GH613: Disease Control and Global Health

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    The course introduces global trends of priority health problems such as: CD (Malaria/HIV-AIDS/TB/Avian Flu), NCD (Cardio-vascular, diabetes, cancer), mental health, injuries (vehicular, violence-suicide), tobacco and alcohol. Further, the course applies a critical appraisal; with a focus on interrelationships of economic conditions, partnerships, funding and the politics; of issues such as: EPI, PHC, ARI, Malaria-HIV-AIDS-TB control, MCH, Reproductive Health. Case studies make use of ethnographies, epidemiologic studies, program reports, and policy papers.

  • GH614: Political Economy of Global Health

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    This course will examine technical, social, political and economic factors related to international agreements and public health.These will include organizational setting(s) and mandates, negotiation processes, and interplay of technical, political, social and economic factors in negotiating and implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the International Health Regulations (IHRs), and the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).The course will examine the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO), its policy relationship to the WHO on health matters, and the public health implications of WTO Agreements. Further, this course applies a critical appraisal; with a focus on interrelationships of economic conditions, partnerships, funding and the politics; of issues such as: globalization and the challenges to health systems: the burden of local problems and international transfer of risk. International cooperation: reconciling national self-interest and international mutual interest; globalization & health sector reform; public-private mix & internal brain drain; globalization of the health sector; addressing performance: health policy and planning, decentralization, health financing, human resources for health and quality of care.

  • GH615: Research Methods in Global Health

    2 credits | required | trimester-2

    This course is designed to familiarize students with knowledge and skills required to carry out an applied enquiry within global health using qualitative, quantitative or combined research methods. Topics include: designs, sampling strategies; measurement and operationalization; questionnaire design; interviewing, data editing and coding; secondary analysis; issues in the selection of database management; and ethical influences on research studies. Examples are used from ongoing research in low-and middle income settings. Students gain practical experience through a series of mini cases.

  • GH616: Global Health Practicum

    2 credits | exchange | trimester-2

    This exchange course conducted by Maastricht University, Netherlands in collaboration with Manipal University, India offers students involvement in a variety of practice settings including malaria control, HIV/AIDS control, migrant health, occupational health, mental health, mother and child care. Students from partnering institutes will work together in groups of 3 or 4 students on small investigations related to these local projects. During the practicum they have time for data collection, analysis and documenting results. Results will be presented to other students and faculty at the end of the two weeks period.

  • GH617: Foundations of Global Health-2

    3 credits | exchange | trimester-2

    This exchange course conducted by Maastricht University provides students with insight into the environment for program and project planning as well as the global context and tools/awareness to continuously update their understanding. They experience working in diverse teams using online communication tools. In course students will learn how to develop and implement responsive interventions to the changing shape of development assistance for health; adapt to local circumstances, divergent stakeholders' interests and issues that may emerge. Students working in pods will be assigned a proposal call from the Global Agency for International Development (GAID) and then under the guidance of a tutor experienced with proposal planning and implementation develop their own proposal to meet the criteria outlined in the project proposal call. At completion of the course students get the opportunity to defend their proposal for a panel during the learning symposium at Manipal India.

  • GH620: Eco Health and Infectious Diseases

    2 credits | elective Eco-Health minor | trimester-3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the core concepts underlying the emerging domains of Eco-Health and One Health. It will provide a broad overview of the key issues in this field that will be dealt with in further depth and detail in the minor concentration on Eco-Health, using relevant examples to illustrate the major problems and challenges. In particular it will explore the inter-disciplinary nature of Eco-Health and One Health and the role of the key actors within this framework. The course will contribute to a better understanding of emerging disease dynamics in the 21st century, what Eco-Health is and its role in addressing emerging infectious disease threats.

  • GH621: One Health Management

    2 credits | elective Eco-Health minor | trimester-3

    This course will introduce the overarching theme of infectious disease surveillance from a national, regional and global perspective. This will include the current state of global surveillance, WHO global event based surveillance/OIE/FAO formal and informal systems. Describe through the use of case studies at the interface of human animal (domestic/wildlife) - ecosystems and provide discussion of cross-sectoral and cross border surveillance. Case studies will include global and national surveillance of animal influenza, rabies and brucellosis and foot & mouth disease.

  • GH622: Border Health

    2 credits | elective Eco-Health minor | trimester-3

    Global health challenges such as emerging pandemic threats increasingly shape and are shaped by the political, economic, and social aspects of globalization. Outbreaks of new infectious diseases can inflict economic havoc on a regional or global scale. Neglected diseases, such as dengue fever, continue to cause immense human suffering. Meanwhile, international regulations that fall outside the health system sphere, such as those governing intellectual property, agriculture, human migration, and greenhouse gas emissions, can have profound impacts on human health. While strong national health systems are critical for meeting population needs, the effects of and capacities to respond to a particular health threat often lie outside the control of any one country and outside the health sector. Public health in the context of transboundary ecology is a growing field that stands out for its engagement with other disciplines from the natural and social sciences (e.g. biology, biomedicine, ecology, epidemiology, sociology, economics, anthropology, critical theory), while grounded in the traditions of public health inquiry. Topics covered include global health and development; disease ecology; emerging infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; place or neighbourhood effects; environmental justice; and spatial epidemiology.

  • GH623: Exposure Monitoring & Assessment

    2 credits | elective Eco-Health minor | trimester-3

    This course provides an overview of all aspects of human health exposure assessment. Exposure assessment is a key component of eco-health and the goal of much of ecological monitoring. This class will cover all major exposure media and all important pathways. It will also include exposure assessment study design, the strengths and weaknesses of various exposure assessment techniques, and how to link exposure assessment with eco-health. Case study examples will demonstrate the state-of-the-art approaches aiming to decrease the uncertainty associated with the exposure assessment process. The important linkages of exposure assessment and monitoring to the decision-making, risk management process will be emphasized.

  • GH630: Reframing Non-Communicable Diseases

    2 credits | elective NCD minor | trimester-3

    Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have come to include non-communicable diseases and injuries (NCD-Is). And yet the poor in low and middle income countries (LMICs) are still unlikely to benefit from this expanded focus. Despite efforts by global actors, the development community has mainly understood NCD-Is as a problem linked to ageing, urbanisation, affluence, and lifestyle choices. This course draws on the literature to address four questions: (1) how is the growing burden of NCD-Is changing the epidemiology in LMICs; (2) what determines and drives this burden, and what are the commonalities with communicable diseases; (3) what is the rationale for public intervention; and (4) how could LMICs approach NCD-Is prevention and care to achieve SDGs?

  • GH631: Violence and Global Health

    2 credits | elective NCD minor | trimester-3

    This course will focus on the identification, prevention, and mitigation of forms of violence that impact particularly upon vulnerable women and children in all societies. It will analyse the problem as it exists in homes, schools, places of work, care and detention centres, entertainment venues, and in areas of conflict. It will examine the problem as one where the imbalance of power and inequity is exacerbated by poverty, ethnicity, religion, and gender. With regard to the latter, violence will be discussed as a major cause and consequence of gender inequity.In keeping with its place in a global health curriculum, violence against women and children will be considered in the context of international human rights laws, covenants, and standards and how these can be used to strengthen national responses for the protection of women and children.Childhood injuries, both intentional and unintentional, will be discussed in the context of violence as a further consequence of children living in unsafe, unprotected and poorly supervised environments. The role of national and global society in creating psychologically as well as physically protected environments for children will be explored.

  • GH632: Global Mental Health

    2 credits | elective NCD minor | trimester-3

    Mental disorders are an important cause of long-term disability worldwide and the WHO attributes 31.7% of all years lived with disability to mental health disorders. These disorders are estimated to cause 1.4 million deaths each year and are becoming a dominant cause of ill health worldwide.In this intensive course, students will explore the epidemiology and social determinants of mental health disease globally and learn to evaluate the complex relationship between mental health and general health. Additionally, students will learn to think critically about designing interventions and enhancing services to affected populations within the confines of socio-economic disadvantaged settings.

  • GH633: Public Nutrition and Global Health

    2 credits | elective NCD minor | trimester-3

    Public health nutrition is an area of concentration emphasizing the application of food and nutrition knowledge, policy, and research to the improvement of the health and wellbeing of populations. From a global health and population wellbeing perspective, the course combines principles and practices from nutrition and social and behavioral science to evaluate programs and policies that address or ignore nutrition concerns. Students in will gain a perspective on the following critical questions such as: What are the most critical social, behavioral, and food and nutrition-related factors that affect health? What are ways that the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs can improve the nutritional status of the population or subgroups in the population? How can nutrition and food related public policies affect the public's health, especially in vulnerable populations? How can global, national, state, and local community interventions be designed to improve the nutritional status of the population as a whole and those at particular risk?

  • GH640: Public Health and Conflict

    2 credits | elective Health & Crisis minor | trimester-3

    This course will provide participants with knowledge and skills related to the practice of public health in conflict situations. It focuses on the provision of care and protection to refugees and internally displaced populations, in the context of the shifting public health burdens of aging populations and the increasing significance of non-communicable diseases as causes of morbidity and mortality.In addition to providing critical discussion on the basic concepts and principles of humanitarian interventions and of the current structure of the international humanitarian system, the courses provide hands-on learning experiences for students to develop and practice skills related to pre-event risk assessment, institutional preparedness and community resilience, as well as post-event damage and needs assessments, operational planning and the overall public health management of the relief and recovery phases.

  • GH641: Public Health and Natural Hazards

    2 credits | elective Health & Crisis minor | trimester-3

    This course will provide participants with knowledge and skills related to the practice of public health in disaster situations, such as earthquakes, floods and storms. It will examine these issues in the context of climate change, urbanisation and aging populations.In addition to providing critical discussion on the basic concepts and principles of humanitarian interventions and of the current structure of the international humanitarian system, the courses provide hands-on learning experiences for students to develop and practice skills related to pre-event risk assessment, institutional preparedness and community resilience, as well as post-event damage and needs assessments, operational planning and the overall public health management of the relief and recovery phases.

  • GH642: Epidemic Management and Control

    2 credits | elective Health & Crisis minor | trimester-3

    This course will provide participants with knowledge and skills related to the practice of public health in disaster situations, such as earthquakes, floods and storms. It will examine these issues in the context of the International Health Regulations and the new international communicable disease control architecture.In addition to providing critical discussion on the basic concepts and principles of epidemic control interventions and of the current structure of the international epidemic control system, the courses provide hands-on learning experiences for students to develop and practice skills related to pre-event risk assessment, institutional preparedness and community resilience, as well as post-event damage and needs assessments, operational planning and the overall public health management of the relief and recovery phases.

  • GH643: Public Health and Technological Hazards

    2 credits | elective Health & Crisis minor | trimester-3

    This course will provide participants with knowledge and skills related to the practice of public health in technological emergencies, such as intentional and non-intentional nuclear events, and chemical events and also major public order events.In addition to providing critical discussion on the basic concepts and principles of humanitarian interventions and of the current structure of the international security system, the courses provide hands-on learning experiences for students to develop and practice skills related to pre-event risk assessment, institutional preparedness and community resilience, as well as post-event damage and needs assessments, operational planning and the overall public health management of the relief and recovery phases.

  • GH650: Strategic Management and Leadership

    2 credits | elective Management minor | trimester-3

    This course addresses the challenges of leadership and strategic management in public and non-profit organizations. The course provides students with the conceptual and analytic tools needed to build and lead a new or established organization. The focus is on how to build and enhance an organization's capacity to achieve its goals. The course makes use of dialogue lectures, case studies and team-learning.

  • GH651: Principles of Organizational Management

    2 credits | elective Management minor | trimester-3

    The course provides students with an engaging and informative introduction to the discipline of management applied to public health settings. The course familiarizes students with key perspectives and debates from a range of fields that inform management. The course enables students to understand the complexity of issues that shape contemporary management practices. The focus of this course will include the foundations of management theories; human perspectives of management; authority and responsibility; competitive perspectives of management; and international perspectives of management.

  • GH652: Public and Non-Profit Budgeting and Financial Management

    2 credits | elective Management minor | trimester-3

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public and non-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. The first module of the course deals with the managerial perspective of budgeting and financial management, including planning, implementation, and control. The second module focuses on the basic financial aspect, including financial health analysis and financial reporting.

  • GH653: Public Health Management

    2 credits | elective Management minor | trimester-3

    This course deals with public health and quality-of-life issues in the metropolitan and regional contexts. The topics covered include the evolving role of public health specialists and professional managers, and special considerations in finance, service delivery, economic development, and democratic participation/engagement at the local community level. The course offers integration of classroom learning with simulations and case studies. Students will work in groups on real world problems faced by public and non-profit organizations.

  • GH660: Introduction to Global Health Economics

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This course examines global health issues from the perspective of applied economics. Specific topics include: (1) understanding the complex relationship between health, population, and economic growth; (2) understanding key challenges to improving individual and global health (3) recognizing differences between optimal health decisions from an individual, national, and global perspective. We will examine the empirical evidence in support of interventions affecting health including the success and failure of interventions that target maternal and infant mortality, HIV-AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria as well as smoking and obesity. We will also investigate the role of health insurance as well as different approaches to deliver health care in resource-constrained settings. Prerequisite: applied statistics.

  • GH661: Global Development and Social Justice

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    The design of this course is guided by following key questions: (1) what is global development; (2) how can we plan, monitor, and evaluate an intervention in the development field; and (3) how can we build on the principle of subsidiarity in a continuously globalizing world? This course introduces students to key concepts of global development in the context of social justice and well-being, including fundamentals about various development discourses, combining concerns for international development with awareness of individual human rights, the common good, solidarity and subsidiarity. Various themes relevant to global public health will be introduced such as: the development paradox and health challenges, sustainable development as health development, and global inequalities and health. Contemporary development issues such as the north-south divide, minorities, women, migration, environment, public health, and conflict will be examined through common models and tools of intervention. Case studies referring to non-governmental organizations, inter-governmental organizations, and national governments will also be emphasized.

  • GH662: Communication for Social Change

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    Communication for social change is designed for global health professionals to offer students the opportunity to explore a variety of communication tools in global social change contexts. Students are exposed to an investigation of how communication can be used to enhance public participation in decision-making, community empowerment, policy advocacy. In applying knowledge and building skills, student may work on topics such as social determinants of health, disaster management, global public goods, etc. This course will be taught through case studies, interactive seminars, student led sessions, and analytical reflection to apply participatory communication techniques within the context of their discipline.

  • GH663: Globalization & Health Systems

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    Globalization has an unequal impact on health systems in developed and developing countries and their possibilities of establishing universal and comprehensive health services alongside healthy public policies. Inequalities in access to health services and in the resourcing of health systems have widened. As a result of globalization forces policies have been promoted, adopted or imposed in many LMICs despite mounting evidence that they can have a negative impact on access to care among the poorest. A variety of cases are used from across the globe illustrating most common reform measures to review evidence on their impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of health systems. Case studies are then used to illustrate success and failure and arrive at policy conclusions.

  • GH664: Health in Prisons

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    The course provides global public health and other health professionals with the tools needed to critically analyse and address the myriad clinical, policy and ethical issues in prison health care. The course is global in scope, covering the health needs of prison populations through a focus on the organization of prison health care and multi-disciplinary challenges facing healthcare providers internationally. The course includes a major emphasis on faculty-student interaction discussing throughout the course ethical issues in prison practice.

  • GH665: Program Evaluation

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This course is designed for global public health professionals enabling them to address common questions raised across by a variety of stakeholders for example: communities, funders, implementing agencies, and those who develop interventions. Program evaluation generates answers to the questions such as: Who is a program intended to serve; what are its goals; what does the program actually look like; who does it actually reach; what are its outcomes; how can an intervention be improved to better meet its goals; what needs to be adapted for replication in setting; why should a program continue to be funded; which intervention yields better outcomes; which is more cost-effective? Evaluation covers a range of assessments from specific interventions to partnerships to strategies and policies. The course provides a comprehensive review of theoretical and methodological approaches to program evaluation relevant for global public health. Further, the course focuses on specific skills relevant to and commonly used in conducting program evaluations. Group work on learning projects provides opportunities to apply knowledge and skills.

  • GH666: Geographic Information System

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    The course is an introduction to the concepts and application of geographic information systems and science (GIS). It is designed for students without former GIS experience. It focuses on the use of GIS for scientific inquiry and on its application for real-world problem solving. Different types of GIS spatial analysis are studied and applied such as suitability analysis, surface analysis and 3D analysis. Case studies from various environmental research domains are used as demonstrations. Each topic is comprised of a theoretical introduction and of an exercise. The exercises include training on software package. The final project consists of designing and applying a GIS analysis model relevant to the students' field of interest.

  • GH667: Biosafety

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This course will provide an overview of the field of biological safety and its application to the control biohazards in a wide variety of settings for students at all levels who are interested in the epidemiology of microbial diseases. Students will review biohazards and examine select case studies to identify critical biosafety lapses. The course will teach participants how to perform a comprehensive qualitative risk assessment for biohazards and learn how to employ the control strategies to appropriately manage these risks. Course concepts can be applied to the control of biohazards during the review of proposed research involving biohazards, along with emphasizing protective measures when addressing incidents involving biohazards, such as emergency spills or bioterrorism related events. The course will provide multiple opportunities to gain direct hands-on experience and review key course concepts through interactive exercises, case studies and site visits.

  • GH670: Special Topics in Global Health

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This Special Topics in Global Health course provides the opportunity for students to pursue a specialized course of study in enquiry, planning, management or evaluation methodologies applied to a global health area of special interest. A study on Special Topics in Global Health complements rather than replaces or substitutes for core and major course work.

  • GH671: Special Topics in Global Health

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This Special Topics in Global Health course provides the opportunity for students to pursue a specialized course of study in enquiry, planning, management or evaluation methodologies applied to a global health area of special interest. A study on Special Topics in Global Health complements rather than replaces or substitutes for core and major course work.

  • GH672: Special Topics in Global Health

    2 credits | free elective | trimester-3

    This Special Topics in Global Health course provides the opportunity for students to pursue a specialized course of study in enquiry, planning, management or evaluation methodologies applied to a global health area of special interest. A study on Special Topics in Global Health complements rather than replaces or substitutes for core and major course work.

  • GH700: Independent study-1

    3 credits | required for plan B | trimester-2

    The independent study-1 is a capstone experience for students in Plan-B of the program, which uses the knowledge and skills acquired during the course of study leading to the Master's degree. This study is designed to introduce students to the process of designing, developing, executing, and reporting on their independent projects and practical activities. Students will formulate and conduct an appropriate independent study project and practical activity aligned with their personal and professional goals. Seminars will afford students the opportunity for peer review and instructors' feedback. Conducting a practicum is an integral part for of students' independent study work relevant to global health.

  • GH701: Independent study- 2

    3 credits | required for plan B | trimester-3

    The independent study-2 is a continuation of the capstone experience for students in Plan-B of the program, which uses the knowledge and skills acquired during the course of study leading to the Master's degree. This study is designed to introduce students to the process of reporting on their independent study projects and practical activities. Students will formulate an appropriate report on their independent study project. Seminars will afford students the opportunity for peer review and instructors' feedback.

  • GH800: Thesis

    15 credits | required for plan A | trimester-3

    The thesis is an individual student project to demonstrate his/her ability to formulate, investigate, and analyse a problem in a practice setting. Students choose a topic, relevant to global health, as well as their specific study focus, with the advice and approval of advisors who agree to supervise and evaluate the students' work. Participation in seminars is an integral part of students' thesis work.

  • Academic Skills Seminars-1

    0 credits | required | trimester-1

    The Academic Skills Seminars-1 offers a series of seminars with the aim to provide fundamental skill building in applied critical thinking and academic writing through the development of a master thesis or project concept paper as well as basic skills in using computer software applications such as Moodle, Blackboard Collaborate, library search, e-library sources, SPSS, EndNote, and Turn-it-in.

  • Academic Skills Seminars-2

    0 credits | required | trimester-2

    The Academic Skills Seminars-2 offers a series of seminars with the aim to provide fundamental skill building in critical appraisal of information through a journal club. Students are also introduced to writing a research proposal, oral presentation skills, computer software applications such as Microsoft Word advanced features, and applied critical thinking through the development of a master thesis or project proposal.

  • Academic Skills Seminars-3

    0 credits | required | trimester-3

    The Academic Skills Seminars-3 offers a series of seminars with the aim to provide fundamental skill building in applied critical thinking such as: grant writing, writing a project report, a journal paper, and preparing a conference poster. In addition, students are also introduced to Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for program budgeting and management purposes as well as being prepared for the job search process by assisting students step-by-step through the creation of the most common sections found on resumes in today's job market, including determining what information should be included and highlight what pitfalls to avoid when creating this job-searching tool.

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